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Five Feelings of Fatherhood

1) Overwhelming joy is when, after 26 hours of harrowing labour and an emergency caesarian, you know they're both going to be okay.

2) Sneaky pride is when, despite being enclosed in an incubator, your son manages to do a giant tsunami of poo all over the nurse none of us like.

3) Wonder is when you look at your child and see flashes of each other and your families in his expressions, but know that he is entirely himself.

4) Smirking insight is when, after seeing the grief trying to burp and fart can cause, you understand why we are so eager to demonstrate our progress at primary school.

5) Exhaustion is when you think of all the nights you ever stayed up late in your life and mentally berate your foolishness for voluntarily choosing not to partake of precious, precious sleep.


Morgan.

Doctor Who

Was musing that, from a producer's point of view, Doctor Who must be the perfect show. If a major cast member quits... they can easily be written out and new companions brought in. If the lead actor quits... well you kill him off and get make him regenerate into a new Doctor. And this is not only okay by the fans, it's expected! Additionally, you pretty much can't have continuity errors since its all about time travel anyway and any such occurrences can at the very least be simply explained away as paradoxes or the result of disturbance from the Time War.

I'm loving the series revival so far, it has the appropriate mix of epic, scary and silly. The Stephen Moffat episodes (The Empty Child/The Doctor Dances, The Girl in the Fireplace, Blink, and Silence in the Library - not seen Forest of the Dead yet) are absolutely amazing and I'll be very keen to see what happens next season when he takes over as head writer. I can quite honestly say that 'Blink' is one of the best pieces of television and/or film that I have ever seen.

Best single Doctor Who moment ever though is without question at the opening of "Fear Her" when the Tardis materializes.

Anyway, don't wish this to become a review, rather a short note of appreciation. I'm being very good and restrained and not looking up "Forest of the Dead" on YouTube even though I'm slowly dying of curiosity and anticipation. So far so good but then it is only Tuesday ><

Morgan.

Hair, or lack thereof

I've come to the conclusion that hair is wasted on the young(er). Especially mine.

One thing I always found amusing about the movie 'Forrest Gump' was the character of Jenny and how her hairstyle changed as time passed in the film to whatever the stereotype of the era happened to be. What made this amusing to me is that my mum had every single one of those styles and more. Unfortunately however, this open minded approach to hair meant that she let me get my hair cut however I wanted.

I was bald until I was 2 pretty much and once I started growing hair Mum was quite loathe to cut it. Thus for most of my early years I had a mop of blond tresses (didn't go dark til 12ish) and this combined with a unisex name prompted most other kids meeting me for the first time to ask whether I was a boy or a girl. Clearly this started to grate on my developing male ego because by the time I was the impressionable age of 7 I opted to go for the manly style that was "spikes". I liked this so much that within a few years I grew a rat-tail to go with it. (You cringed, I can tell.) But fear not! By the age of 13 I realized how silly rat-tails were and grew it out... into a mullet. *Sigh* This of course nastily coincided with my mum getting a new camera so even though I had it for all of 6 months a glance through the family photo album would strongly suggest otherwise. *Deeper sigh*

Luckily things get better. In my mid-teens I developed my still-present love of 70s Prog Rock. I played in a band, liked D&D, read fantasy books, surfed, had a healthy disrespect for authority, it was the 90s, grunge was cool... growing my hair long was inevitable. This did mean suffering through a phase where I looked suspiciously like Bud Bundy, and then another where I looked suspiciously like Guybrush Threepwood but come 16 I finally reached hair Nirvana! (pun totally intended.) Additionally I grew facial hair around this age which over the years would vary drastically between goatee and full beard and (in my mind anyway) musketeer style moustache. Many happy hippy years ensued.

Anyway, to cut a long story short (you cringed again!) at 20 I decided change was needed and said goodbye to long hair. Unfortunately not long afterwards I also had to start saying goodbye to a certian amount of my hairline. Figured it would happen eventually, just didn't realize eventually was so soon. Fast forward ten years, and as of last summer you may have noticed that I am now also clean-shaven (well, expect for a soulpatch) for the first time in 15 years. My face just kinda stopped suiting facial hair or something.

Which brings me out of ramble territory and to the point of all this. Although I probably wouldn't use one if I had any I do somewhat miss having options with my hair. Nowadays a haircut is not about getting what I want, it's about best disguising what I'm missing. A shave is a practicality again rather than a small creative endeavour. I have little call to complain too much though, my hair has thinned and receded to a point and then stopped doing so (for now at least...). And that point isn't that all that bad really.

Anyway, despite all this I thought I was relatively at peace with my hair situation until a few recent events made me realize that I have a mild irrational resentment of female hair. Not cos I wish mine was like that. Not cos girls don't have to worry about going bald. But because so many have this beautiful hair... and they keep messing with it!

An overseas friend of mine has this long dark brunette hair that just looks gorgeous in its simplicity. But saw a recent picture of her and she now has this trendy side fringe and blonde streaks and random thinner-at-the-ends layer thingies and now she looks like a character from some bad anime. She loves it which is the important thing but it makes me sad. Not that I'd ever say that to her (mostly cos she'd mock me for being old and boring). She's allowed to express herself and my aforementioned hair history certainly gives me no right to judge style in the slightest. Just yeah... why mess with something (so often) that was so beautiful just for the sake of change?

It does seem that the worst culprits are hairdressers though. Has anyone ever met one that actually cuts one's hair the way one asked? I can't help imagine what's going through their minds when one tells them what they would like: (insert faux-European accent of your choosing) "A trim... a TRIM?!?! I am an artist! You insult my talent! Nooo, you shall have layers, you shall have volume, you shall have couleur and you will love it!!"

Anyway, I have no idea where to go after that terrible stereotype (and besides, my last haircut was actually quite decent), so I shall wrap things up. Certainly not the topic I expected to write/rant about when I started this blog but I guess hair has been on my mind. >.>

Peace,
Morgan.



P.S: I just looked up 'Soulpatch' cos its strange name intrigued me. Apparently named so because its more comfortable than other facial hair when playing a trumpet and thus was popular among soul and jazz musicians. Groovy.
I have started a blog. Shall be interesting to see how I am at maintaining it. I suspect not spectacularly, but one never knows. At the very least I have an identity here to keep in touch with people who are much better at keeping a blog, so all good.

Have been musing over what I could write about. Track by track reviews of the entire output of Jethro Tull was considered but then quickly discarded as the idea is to keep in contact with friends rather than scare them away. Likewise I promise not to write anything about WoW. Ah well, elimination leads to focus eventually :)


Morgan.




My favourite lolcat ever!

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